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Found a Quicker Way...(Segue from Welcome - NEW Member Forum)

Handy Andy

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#1
I'm re-threading this set of posts over here so the amalgamated - Welcome Thread can hold it's own...

Anyways...

Found a easy way to the Sensor - but - well, I'll let you folks decide this and which route to take.

Firstly, the Ambient Air Temp sensor I have ( or had) was installed wrong - at least when I discovered it...

The Vehicle is new (to me and SOS) so to have this happen and how the Dealers' non-resolution resolve - comes into this a separate beast for it's own, which is beyond my response to post this...

So what you're seeing is my rework...

The Ambient Air Temp sensor is on the Front Skirt by the Snorkel for the Air Box.

I was helping in the thread and since this kinda' reopened an old wound, I figured I'd better do up a post or two as a Salve to ease the effort for the next guy...

So - let's cut to the Chase...
1620860312959.png
That's it!
a roughly $7 sensor​

I took apart the Battery tray and cleaned out the road salt and inspected the tray, holster and made sure all wiring was still in good condition, which requires removal of the Air Box, Snorkel, Air Intake hose, and Left Front Headlamp.

This is so you have clearance to gain access and remove the Battery tray and Battery - check and clean neutralize the acids and inspect, check level and top-off the OEM Battery water - just for a measure of prevention.

The OEM Battery is a Maintenance Free type - take that in whatever way you wish, but it's simply a Battery with plates in a Deep-Well flood design so thru it's normal life cycle, it shouldn't go dry. I said Normal - but what is normal?

,Any Battery maintained well and kept clean and topped off, DOES last longer and in this day and age, it makes more sense to keep what you have working than to take chances on ignorance and lack of car care, being your guide.

Back to the task...

1620860861752.png
This got left dangling and made an annoying Rattle because of the original way it was mounted was
INSIDE the Grille exposed to all the salt debris and Grime so what you see above is the "wash me" moment
If you look below the probe, you'll see the two "Gator" clips - one got truncated,
Caused that when I tried to originally remove the sensor that was inside the Grille.
This view is the Sensor resting on the cutout of the Left front Headlamp I removed..

1620861391739.png
In this view,
The mounting location is at the Grille, you're seeing looking down inside Front Left Headlamp opening
Showing the position of where the Ambient Air temp sensor goes...
Air Box and Headlamp is removed - Snorkel Cutout to Air Box at Upper Right by Radiator shroud.
You can readily see that you can swap out the Sensor easily
just have to take parts off to get the room to obtain access to the Sensor.

The Sensor
1620861850838.png
To protect the Sensor, the Electrical Connector is LARGER of the two,
You press the Tab and the Electrical Connecter as it is the outer SLEEVE that holds the sensor
pull it apart holding the Gator Tabs and TAB of the connector (don't pull the Nose - it's has the Electronics and it could get Damaged)
Those Gator tabs of the Sensor is what holds the whole mess in the Grille,
The Electrical Connector acts as a protective sleeve, the Nose sticks out into the Airstream for the temperature
The Electrical Connector holds this to the harness .
1620862187568.png
Another view to help you see the sensors simplicity and how the connector
protects the Sensor and acts as the load bearing weight to the harness
1620862315166.png
It's got a similar number per the Threads earlier postings, but this is the
NEW Part Number!

Once it's put back together - it looks like this correctly mounted...
1620862401866.png
Reassembly required...
Put you and your car back together as you see fit...

 
Last edited:
OP
Handy Andy

Handy Andy

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Thread Starter #2
Some hints to help others with Battery and Tray issues...

1620872480361.png

Just trying to add in another "How-to's" to to help those who can...

Wear Gloves and Eye protection as much as possible.

In the above mosaic - the Battery is disconnected, then the top Hold down is removed - along with it's Brace - to let you lift out the Battery - keeping it level.

Might want to make sure to clear the area around the Battery, pull off the hose from the Air Intake to the Throttle - loosen the Hose clamp on the Throttle side and remove/loosen the top 4 - #25 Torx screws and the single side mount shock mount for the Air Box Filter base - remove the Breather hose clip from the Air Box Base and gently pry away the Snorkel air diverter.

The Airbox Base can be now pulled pried up gently and removed.

You can now use a 10mm socket and 12" extension to remove the 3 bolts that hold down the tray.
Use a 8mm Socket to remove the first of 2 ECM bolts...
One the Side closest to the Front at the ECM - there is a small dimple - pry this up using a flat blade screwdriver tip to help provide the tension to release the dimple from the Tray - This will help release the ECM's cover - which then exposes the 2nd 8mm bolt - remove it to release the ECM from the Battery Tray and the Tray can now be lifted out.

Best to get it right over to a hose and rise this tray out well with water to remove debris and dilute-neutralize any acid residue.

Inspect it for cracks and stains looking for clues, showing leaking acid
  • - if you see some "water spotting" it's normal
  • - when you see brown color rust mixed in with the water stain, then consider the Battery potentially failed - Cracked case - should be replaced
  • - the Tray if it's only stained, can be rewashed and scrubbed with Baking Sodas and Water mix to restore the Tray to nearly new condition
  • - Inspect tray, the Holster and the bolts used to hold the tray down including the sockets on the car- rinsing and cleaning with Baking Soda Water mix to restore condition allow to dry.
Battery Inspection:

This can be involved, use this only as a guide to help you navigate....
Gently remove - pry up and lift off the covers to the Cells - prevent Dirt from entering into the Cells - keep workplace clean as possible​

  • Look for
  • stains and "yellowing" showing the battery could have overheated or boiled (Erupted)
  • Low water - water spotting - heavy calcium caking
    • - meaning that the Acids inside the cells are now lower, less than ideal in Specific Gravity, use a Hygrometer as needed to check and to visually see if Plates are exposed to air - low/no water, boiled dry
  • Electrolyte cloudy or Oily - contaminated cells - replace the battery
  • - "GREEN EYE" not visible or more than one cell is dry replace (Recycle) battery
    • - it's safer than to try to replenish acids - the plates can be damaged and render the effort useless.
  • Gently inspect the covers,
    • look for Dirt or plugged holes note the condition of the covers and the areas they seal against
    • - high levels of water stains indicates tipping or sloshing of solution and leaked out of the cells to dry in place outside
    • - possibly from loose mounting or the WEDGE the Battery Size uses to keep it holstered in the tray may have corroded and now is gone, lost the ability to keep battery stable and level.
    • - can cause excessive water loss and in some instances the Battery can freeze in winter causing the plates and case to crack - lessening the batteries usefulness.
  • Strong Odor the stench of acidic fumes - means the battery has leaked, or has gassed excessively - possibly from overcharging - inspect charging system.
Once you have inspected and cleaned off the battery and tray - all of the hardware and case - if you are satisfied with the cleaning and any repair - you can reassemble the system in the opposite order - with the Battery Ground connection being the last reattachment to the Battery.


The above is a guide to help you diagnose, but is not the full guide on Battery care or maintenance - the responsibility belongs to you, but the choice to replace, repair or Recycle also depends upon your ability to do this alone.

Best to have a support of a coworker or supervisor, if you cannot lift the battery out of the tray without considerable effort, there may be a bursting issue and the system needs to be taken to a Dealer or Service center capable of handling the toxicity of this condition - attempts to remove a battery in a bursted or exploded condition can expose to you to extreme harm and acid burns.

Common sense takes precedence over bodily harm and injury due to mistakes and forgetfulness. Due diligence is your only choice - no other options are possible.
 
Last edited:

scotman

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#3
Everyone should not underestimate the amount of dirt, leaves , bugs, salt spray, road grime (and even a dead bird i found up in there!) That can accumulate as the air swirls through the engine compartment.
I believe that this process of pulling the battery and tray to do some cleaning is a good idea to perform at least every other year.
It is cheap peace of mind in avoidance of the dreaded ground connection rot that many people are seeing. And it really is not an expensive thing to do at all. In fact, its a tiny cost compared to a tow truck call and one hour of diagnosis labor at a competent repair shop.
 
OP
Handy Andy

Handy Andy

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Thread Starter #4
Wanted to post this here, to help others in understanding how places like a Dealership - will treat your car.

When you do modifications to the car, like dropping in a new motor, delete the AC or Muffler or changing the transmission from one type to another - or even changing the wheels and rims to affect the height - these little things affect the way the car can be dealt with on the Used Car market.

So, if you decide to mod the car then decide to sell it later - the dealership doesn't want to play around with you and your mess - it will auction it off to a third-party market - your ending sale price of trade it is worth as, is at the mercy of this market.

IF you wonder why places like Carvana can even do business?
How about, why your insurance costs the amount it does?
  • - look at your VIN codes to help you decipher the make and model of WHAT IS EXPECTED
  • - and then figure out what you did or CHANGED IT TO when you did these mods, and then understand you are at the mercy of others and what they want in a car when it comes to re-sale.
Attached a PDF of a 2019 VIN explanation thru FORD and there is more information in it to help you when it comes to resellers.
 

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scotman

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#5
Sad but true. Trick rims, rear seat deletes, wild graphics and wide body kit installs get zero love from the retail dealership sales managers.
 
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Handy Andy

Handy Andy

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Thread Starter #6
To help in selection:
1659281489916.png

The Go-To plug a dealership would use for a Spark Plug Replacement tune up is usually an SP-525 and base is COPPER, with upgrades to Platinum and Iridium as the type of electrode used.

Double tipped? Spitfire? Ring gap? Read their fine print - it could be that the electrode and its ground are both the same material. OR that the grounding tip - for the electrode - is split or designed in a ring to allow the spark to jump a gap across to the Ground Electrode in a fashion that exposes the spark in a greater surface area - not just to ground. To some enthusiasts - this side-arc gap is claimed to help the discharge to make a better, stronger, ignition source in the chamber by providing more of the discharges energy to be exposed in the fuel-air mixture in the chamber.
  • IN some views, the design of the vertical electrode gap is thought of as a hinderance, where the electrodes and their orientation have to provide a means to make the fuel-air charge mixture ignite so their position in the air fuel flow can hinder the plugs' ability to fire and fire well on a consistent basis
1659303511252.png
1659303558630.png
1659303599080.png
As far as gap, best to review the plugs you're replacing - you can review their gap and even see the change in gap distance that occurs when the spark plugs fire. Small amounts of molten core of the tip and electrode are blasted or moved from their location a process often called pitting - the heat of the spark melts the metal when the spark jumps and strikes against the opposite electrode. The migration of the metal erodes the tip, affecting the gap.
1659282623120.png
To me, it is a good idea to hold onto a set of used plugs until you can safely presume you have installed the new ones correctly. For if something were to occur, refer to the "rough handling" - during the install, you'll need to put the used plug or plugs in to limp the vehicle back to the store you got the plugs from to get a replacement.

As far as Electrode designs, the choice is up to you. But you do want the best or optimal distance from the cylinder head into the chamber for the electrode, as it fires, can ignite the mixture.

Look carefully at the Electrode Wear photo above, note the erosion.

I'm referring to it's tip...

Another closer look...
1659664623317.png
The tip of the left is what usually occurs when plugs reach the end of their useful life.

It's normal - the tip electrode is worn flat, and the ground electrode is worn to a point that the tip has eroded.

One thing to help remember - when you have a simple spark - even with a single electrode, the tips are absorbing the arcs heat - so the broader tip allows for the current in the spark to jump that gap, but the size or amount of the metal that electrode has, can play a role in how efficient the spark can ignite the mixture.

There was a time when it was thought that multiple electrodes offered more a means to ignite the fuel mixture. But as time progressed - the results were disappointing as the electrodes tended to get in the way of the mixture to even make the spark be seen by the fuel and air charge. Much of the arc was wasted energy that stayed too far into the spark plugs well, the area that is the gap between the Grounding tips and that center electrode. The Manufacturers went back to a simpler single-electrode design. - small high energy bursts are the preferred way to ignite a fuel charge in a cylinder. But an electrode that gets too hot can cause a preignition or spark knock you don't want. Thats power being wasted as heat energy - can cause a backfire condition, and if too early in the compression stroke, it can damage the motor. So, they made some refinements and made the tips of various alloys of rare earth metals to make them survive the internal combustion conditions.

Not just the electrodes but where they are placed in the cylinder - and how far in - depth the plug's threaded shaft has to project the electrodes inside - so they can be exposed to the charge in the cylinder.

That distance is called REACH - so if the longer threaded portion of the head is there, it requires the plug to also have the longer reach to meet into the cylinder head at the right height for clearance from the head, and to keep the piston from striking the plug damaging both the plug and the piston.


To be continued...
 
Last edited:

LionsTooth

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#7
I'm re-threading this set of posts over here so the amalgamated - Welcome Thread can hold it's own...

Anyways...

Found a easy way to the Sensor - but - well, I'll let you folks decide this and which route to take.

Firstly, the Ambient Air Temp sensor I have ( or had) was installed wrong - at least when I discovered it...

The Vehicle is new (to me and SOS) so to have this happen and how the Dealers' non-resolution resolve - comes into this a separate beast for it's own, which is beyond my response to post this...

So what you're seeing is my rework...

The Ambient Air Temp sensor is on the Front Skirt by the Snorkel for the Air Box.

I was helping in the thread and since this kinda' reopened an old wound, I figured I'd better do up a post or two as a Salve to ease the effort for the next guy...

So - let's cut to the Chase...
View attachment 5236
That's it!
a roughly $7 sensor​

I took apart the Battery tray and cleaned out the road salt and inspected the tray, holster and made sure all wiring was still in good condition, which requires removal of the Air Box, Snorkel, Air Intake hose, and Left Front Headlamp.

This is so you have clearance to gain access and remove the Battery tray and Battery - check and clean neutralize the acids and inspect, check level and top-off the OEM Battery water - just for a measure of prevention.

The OEM Battery is a Maintenance Free type - take that in whatever way you wish, but it's simply a Battery with plates in a Deep-Well flood design so thru it's normal life cycle, it shouldn't go dry. I said Normal - but what is normal?

,Any Battery maintained well and kept clean and topped off, DOES last longer and in this day and age, it makes more sense to keep what you have working than to take chances on ignorance and lack of car care, being your guide.

Back to the task...

View attachment 5237
This got left dangling and made an annoying Rattle because of the original way it was mounted was
INSIDE the Grille exposed to all the salt debris and Grime so what you see above is the "wash me" moment
If you look below the probe, you'll see the two "Gator" clips - one got truncated,
Caused that when I tried to originally remove the sensor that was inside the Grille.
This view is the Sensor resting on the cutout of the Left front Headlamp I removed..

View attachment 5238
In this view,
The mounting location is at the Grille, you're seeing looking down inside Front Left Headlamp opening
Showing the position of where the Ambient Air temp sensor goes...
Air Box and Headlamp is removed - Snorkel Cutout to Air Box at Upper Right by Radiator shroud.
You can readily see that you can swap out the Sensor easily
just have to take parts off to get the room to obtain access to the Sensor.

The Sensor
View attachment 5239
To protect the Sensor, the Electrical Connector is LARGER of the two,
You press the Tab and the Electrical Connecter as it is the outer SLEEVE that holds the sensor
pull it apart holding the Gator Tabs and TAB of the connector (don't pull the Nose - it's has the Electronics and it could get Damaged)
Those Gator tabs of the Sensor is what holds the whole mess in the Grille,
The Electrical Connector acts as a protective sleeve, the Nose sticks out into the Airstream for the temperature
The Electrical Connector holds this to the harness .
View attachment 5240
Another view to help you see the sensors simplicity and how the connector
protects the Sensor and acts as the load bearing weight to the harness
View attachment 5241
It's got a similar number per the Threads earlier postings, but this is the
NEW Part Number!

Once it's put back together - it looks like this correctly mounted...
View attachment 5242
Reassembly required...
Put you and your car back together as you see fit...

Also see https://www.fordfiesta.org/threads/2015-se-hb-build.7797/page-5#post-19712
 

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