Performance type front sway bar bushing install...

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#1
I was just cleaning up a front subframe out of a 2012 Fiesta and decided to take a few pictures of an install of performance type frame bushings on the stock sway bar. I have never seen an install with pictures due to the rather well hidden placement of these components. But it's really not that tough of an install if you are able to safely lift and support the car on Jack stands and unbolt the brackets from the subframe from the backside of the subframe.
Access to the left front asb bracket bolt is easier if you remove the left front wheel after raising the car onto Jack stands. The close proximity to the steering gear makes it easier to get at with a 13 M wrench from the drivers wheel well.
You don't have to disconnect the end links to do this upgrade to the asb bushings.
 
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scotman
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Thread Starter #2
The tools, a subframe and two new bushings for the sway bar. IMG_20200221_112451.jpg
 
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scotman
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Thread Starter #3
Loosening up the 13 M bracket bolts. The front left one is the most hard to get at. It's best if you remove the drivers front wheel to get a wrench and/or socket on that bolt. The sway bar will become easy to move around once you have the bolts out.
 

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scotman
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Thread Starter #4
The O.E. bushings are very soft and don't allow the bar to be as effective in it's task.
Both bushings and brackets can be tossed away or set aside depending on whether you have decided to maybe go back to the original parts.
 

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scotman
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Thread Starter #5
The new bushings need to be greased prior to placement on the swaybar. I use a silicone type grease to get the contact surfaces covered and prevent squeeking and binding.I just place some grease into the contact areas and spread it around as evenly into the part as possible without getting the grease outside of the bushing.
I'm using a bushing set that has zerk fittings for adding grease as needed. There are bushing kits available that do not have the zerks, they are perfectly fine for most users. I have found that the non zerk bushings will need to be regreased in approximately 3 year intervals. So, I am not saying anything negative about the less expensive versions!
 

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Thread Starter #6
As shown in the last picture above, the new poly bushings are split just like the O.E. bushings. Now is the time to make sure that you have wiped off the mounting surfaces of the swaybar and the areas where the subframe brackets are bolted down to the subframe. Unlike the subframe pictured here, most are very dirty/ muddy and or oily.
Picture below is of installing the new bushing onto the swaybar. This will be done by feel more than directly seeing it! That's why you should have the area quite clean.
 

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Thread Starter #7
Once you have the bushings in place and located with the flat side of the bushing on the subframe. Now you can place the new brackets over the bushings and start reinstalling the 13M bolts
 

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Thread Starter #8
Again, torque is 35 ft lbs. But clean threads and some blue Permatex thread locker is as good if you can get the bolts tightened down by end wrench and socket there is really no easy way to apply measured torque without dropping the entire subframe! So, save that one for the day you end up removing the entire powertrain! Hopefully never.
 

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Thread Starter #9
The left side front bolt, near the input from the steering column is the most difficult single area due to the close steering rack.
The Energy Suspension bushings are a 7/8 diameter #5337. The basic, non zerk equipped bushings are Energy Suspension #356015.
I will be doing a poly bushings install for the control arms and steering rack in the near future on this subframe.
 
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FiEscort

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#10
Any particular reason you used ES instead of the Powerflex bushings?
 
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Thread Starter #11
I chose them because they are available at the local parts store.
I have used Powerflex bushings. The rear axle beam to chassis mount bushings in my 2011 hatchback are Powerflex. I like the ability to choose a hardness level of bushings. I plan to use Powerflex for the control arm bushings in my next Fiesta.
 

FiEscort

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#12
I chose them because they are available at the local parts store.
I have used Powerflex bushings. The rear axle beam to chassis mount bushings in my 2011 hatchback are Powerflex. I like the ability to choose a hardness level of bushings. I plan to use Powerflex for the control arm bushings in my next Fiesta.
That makes sense. You're right, durometer levels do make a difference. That'll be interesting to hear how switching the LCA bushings go!
 
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Thread Starter #13
I am ordering both of these Powerflex bushing kits. The first image is the ones that allow for Caster adjustment. The second kit is just eurathane bushings to replace the mushy O.E. types. 300x300.png
 

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