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2022 Fiesta

scotman

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#2
It looks like a very mild facelift. Ford is going to shoot its entire wad on battery electric vehicles. They are also conducting a force reduction strategy on the size of their engineering and design staffs. Other cuts will come as the footprint of the company is rightsized.
Nobody should spend even one moment thinking that there is any possibility of cars making a comeback.
 
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econoboxrocks

econoboxrocks

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Thread Starter #3
Not here. I look forward to electric cars, but it's too little too late. We're f***d.
 

Handy Andy

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#5
1632537190915.png
You're not alone in those thoughts...
After the past 8 months? Wonder to worry what else could go wrong...​
 

scotman

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#6
I can't recommend that anyone buy an electric car. There are at least ten reasons other than the inevitable "range anxiety". The notion of giving tax incentives to make the purchase cost affordable is a canard. Because WE are paying for the tax credits.
The hardcore EV proponents are almost universally against the use of natural gas and propane because of their anti carbon fetishes., while at the same time dismissing the fact that natural gas is a zero emissions fuel and propane is damn near as clean with the bonus of having a huge existing delivery infrastructure.
There is no recycling infrastructure for failed or depleted EV battery packs. The handling issues and costs of shipping and storing them is daunting. Don't believe .me? Go into any Ford, Honda or Chevrolet dealership parts department and inquire about how they aquire, handle and return the failed battery packs. They will be happy to educate you about how difficult and expensive it is to ship such a toxic and chemically reactive component.
Rare earth elements. Newsflash! We don't have much of them. There is a very good chance that it will be THE limiting factor in the ability of the industry to scale production. There's no point to building 2.7 million units a year if you can only reliably supply around 1.3 million battery packs.
Charging infrastructure. When you subtract the availability of un metered home charging (because that will have to happen) the number of high speed chargers will have to increase at least 30 fold. Just to provide the time window of available charging for twenty minutes per car, per day! If a non metered home charging setup is around $1,500 bucks today. What will a road tax metered home charging setup cost in five years from now? Keep in mind that this meter will have a government oversight cost tacked on.
High and low temperature usage. These systems require a tightly monitored cooling and heating system that is never inactive. Because cold batteries lose range and hot batteries can do what's called "runaway". An appropriate term. Because when they runaway it is a very hot fire. Don't think about putting it out with a twenty dollar extinguisher. That simply ain't gonna happen.
It all makes the almost un attainable mileage accumulation needed to get a typical hybrid electric gasoline car to the point of being cost effective look positively rosey and doable!
All this being less than half of the items on my list of "yeah, buts" on EV's i will say that there are some people who could be perfectly ok and happy with an EV! And that's fine. But the notion of tens of millions of them is very fanciful, to be polite.
 
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econoboxrocks

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Thread Starter #7
The problem is that we need rare elements to make batteries and all the other stuff for an electric future. We go to war for that sh*t.
If we can't find a way to make it easier to make power with simpler, more plentiful elements, we're going extinct.
 

scotman

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#8
Yeah. I believe that we recently gave up the occupation of a region of the world that has a good supply of lithium. But, being Americans, we didn't bother to exploit the opportunity to take it. Now it will be China that gets those elements.
Another example of how hard Joe is working on building china back better!
Geopolitics! Don't you just love it?
 

scotman

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#10
Given the track record of success the military has had. It might be a lot faster and cheaper to just buy it! Maybe even pay above market price. Then we can give tax credits to make it more affordable to the American consumer!.......oh wait. Uh. Nevermind.
 

Handy Andy

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#11
We also need to remember what happened in Texas when the cold outbreak hit just this past year...


That "stationary" white stuff is the snow...
Happy Valentines Day 2021 !!!​

You simply cannot survive in an electric vehicle - the batteries won't last that long and there was, and currently is not; any feasible means to protect occupants from the cold - and no way to recharge them to maintain them in outages like this..

IT would be suicide (Pure Stupidity?) to think that the "rare freak cold winter outbreak" would Never occur again....

Or maybe that is what they want us to think.

If we're not careful - they just might put us right where they want us...
 

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